Category Archives: Being memorable

The surprising power of what is true

In his book A Moveable Feast, the great American writer Ernest Hemingway, admits to the struggle that even the most devoted and talented writers face: what to write.

“…sometimes when I was starting a new story and I could not get it going, I would sit in front of the fire and squeeze the peel of the little oranges into the edge of the flame and watch the sputter of blue that they made. I would stand and look out over the roofs of

When, where and how should I network?

Now there’s a loaded question.  It’s one I get asked a lot, particularly by people who are in a frantic state about their careers and businesses, are new in town, or are new to the whole notion of networking.  If you want a traditional answer on which networking events you should consider attending, read Chapter 7 in my book The Intentional Networker.  It offers some specific and valuable insights on networking and standing out in the crowd.

But this isn’t meant to be a commercial …

Networking lessons from an art show – Part 1

Do networking lessons happen everywhere? Absolutely, if you’re open to them. And when you are, it’s amazing what you can learn, who you can meet and connect with, and how pivotal and powerful the experience can be.

Take the art show I attended this past weekend.  As my friend Lisa and I wandered through the show, perusing booth after booth filled with extraordinary paintings, photography, jewelry, glass, ceramics and other treasures, we found ourselves enjoying not only the items on display, but also our exchanges …

Turn the gratitude thing around

I’m a fan of Byron Katie, who among other things, is a master at helping you examine your thoughts, especially stressful ones, so you can see them with greater perspective, understanding, compassion, and even gratitude. I want to do that here – minus the stress angle.

Right about now as the U.S. celebrates its Thanksgiving holiday, you may be reading posts and messages about taking stock and feeling grateful.  You may also be receiving emails, texts, mail, or other messages from people who are …

Is the problem with customer service? Or with the customer?

I’m going to toss out a theory and see if it sticks: How you treat service personnel directly reflects your ability to connect effectively, positively, and memorably in your other interactions, including those that take place in networking settings.

Sound crazy?  Maybe. Maybe not.

In my book The Intentional Networker™ I tell the story of how Zappos, a company known for its stellar customer service, initially gauges any job applicant’s hireability. It’s as simple as this: how did you treat their shuttle driver?  If you …

Let’s talk about it

Today I’ll attempt to keep my post short and sweet. Not because I don’t have a lot to say, but because I want you to spend more time thinking about it than reading about it.

The topic?  Your conversations.  (Yes, I know I wrote about this topic back in August, but this post offers yet another twist.)

While attending an NSA Austin event this past week a woman at my table, someone relatively new to the group, commented that she really liked our meetings …

What’s happening in your personal circle?

If you read my last post and took it to heart, I hope you’re thinking about what steps you can take to improve the way you present and conduct yourself as you network and build business relationships.  If you haven’t read it I highly recommend you do so now. Even if you are a seasoned networker, it’s so easy to become complacent or fall into bad habits. (Or maybe the habits you developed are outdated or never worked in the first place.)

Shortly after I …

A question to ponder as you network

If you’re like me you have more professional development books, CD’s, podcasts, and DVD’s in your library than you can keep up with.  After surveying my inventory, getting intentional, and weeding out the items that no longer interest me, I’m on a sincere quest to get caught up. Today I was listening to one of the National Speaker Association’s Voices of Experience CDs (September 2011 if you must know — yes, I’m that far behind). I was listening to the segment in which Brian Walter,

The person everyone is glad they know. Or not.

In my book, The Intentional Networker, I tell the story of a woman who is so eager to be liked and accepted she actually makes a bit of a spectacle of herself.  In fact, she becomes her reputation’s own worst enemy. This woman is generous and well-meaning, but operates in a thoughtless state of hyper-drive.  She talks more than she listens and blurts out instant solutions to everyone’s challenges and requests. She is a chatty, impulsive know-it-all; one of those over-eager people who, let’s be …

How to earn Networking Loyalty

Ever wonder what separates average networkers from those who become trusted must-have connections – your “Twenty-Percenters”, as I refer to them in my presentations? Here are 5 key steps.  (Warning: they are surprisingly simple, but they are not easy.  It takes hard work and diligence to do them well and consistently.)

  1. Pay attention to –  and do  – the little things.  Return phone calls. Show up on time. Be polite and gracious. Have and demonstrate integrity.  Walk your talk.  Do the right thing